How long does a company have to disburse funds thatare owed to an employee?

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How long does a company have to disburse funds thatare owed to an employee?

I am working on a temporary project and I have to fill out an expense report. I have been having issues with the company not providing all my funds. When I make it known to the finance department it takes them 2 weeks before rectifying the issue. Now I pending monies that are due to me and it has been close to a month, still no word, calls, etc. My e-mails are being ignored. When I bring the issue to my supervisor he acts as if he does not care. I believe my company should be obligated to pay for any bounced checks and fees occurred during this period.

Asked on July 18, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Maryland

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

The law does specificy how long a company has to pay employees (though not independent contractors) their salaries or wages; however, it does not specify how long a company has to pay reimursement or how regularly it must pay reimbursement. (For example: reimburse on demand after the expense? Semimonthly or monthy? Quarterly? etc.) This is dealt with by agreement--if there is a formal agreement between the company and the worker (e.g. an employment agreement) covering the matter; or policy in an employee handbook; or by reference to past practice--e.g. when and how long has it taken in the past to reimburse employees. If there is no benchmark within the company, you might look to your industry--how long does it usually take to process reimbursements? How often are employee's reimbursed?  Etc. Since the law does not specify this, you need to look to agreements, correspondence, practice, etc. to establish some expectation. Once that expectation is violated, you have the option of suing, if need be, to get your money.


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