How long do I have to turn myself in after an arrest warrant has been issued and before the police come knocking at my door?

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How long do I have to turn myself in after an arrest warrant has been issued and before the police come knocking at my door?

I received a phone call today from a detective saying that he had issued a warrant for my arrest but that he wouldn’t come looking for me; I should turn myself in at the Sheriff’s department. I had gone in for an interview with this detective a month ago and have been cooperative in their investigation and have no previous record. The charge is theft for more than $1500. So how long do I realistically have before cops come to my house? I have important doctor’s appointments this week. Can I turn myself in next week so I don’t miss the healthcare?

Asked on February 8, 2012 under Criminal Law, Texas

Answers:

Kelly Broadbent / Broadbent & Taylor

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

In Massachusetts, if you have a warrant, the police typically won't chase you down, however, if you are stopped in a traffic stop or they come across you by coincidence, you may be arrested and potentially held.  You best option is to report to the court immediately with an attorney to clear the warrant.  Most likely, where you have no prior criminal record, you would be released on either personal recognizance or a low bail amount that day, with a date to return to the court for pretrial hearing.  


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