How do you file an injury lawsuit without a lawyer?

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How do you file an injury lawsuit without a lawyer?

I fell and injured my knee at a motel around 11 months ago and had surgery done and loss of work. And because I refused to go to the hospital when the ambulance was there I would like to file a lawsuit before the statues of limitations is up. Can you please tell me what steps I have to take?

Asked on June 19, 2012 under Personal Injury, New Jersey

Answers:

William Hayes / The Hayes Law Firm

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

The object of filing a lawsuit is to win it. I agree that you must preserve your claim within the statute of limitations or you will forever be barred from bringing your claim. If you believe you can bring a viable claim without an attorney I would strongly disagree. It is difficult to tell from your question what your theory of liability is or if you could establish a nexus between your injury and the fall. Remember the plaintiff has the burden of proving each and every essential element of their case or their claim will likely be dismissed. The short answer to your question is to contact the Clerk of the Superior Court in the county where your fall occurred to find out the procedure for filing a Civil Claim pro se. My recommendation would be for you to find a plaintiff's attorney in your area who specializes in premises liability to investigate your claim ASAP. Plaintiff's personal injury attorneys usually work on a contingent fee basis should they find merit to your claim which means they charge you a percentage only if they're successful. I'm  active in various trial lawyer associations and can help you find a local qualified attorney to look your case over if you would like. All the Best, Bill Hayes

 

 

 


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