How do we evict storage unit tenants when we have no paperwork, but they haven’t paid in 8 months?

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How do we evict storage unit tenants when we have no paperwork, but they haven’t paid in 8 months?

My husband and I have recently become the managers of a storage unit near our home. The previous manager quit 8 months ago and has no idea or paperwork of who may be in occupied units. The owner lives 2 hours away and has had nothing to do with the units. The current renters have not been paying the fees for the last 8 months. How do we go about getting them under a new contract or having their items removed from storage. Since it has been 8 months without payment do we need to give them notice to remove their things or sign a new contract? Is posting signs on the unit doors enough for notice?

Asked on August 30, 2011 Missouri

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Most states have laws regarding how to dispose of items in public storage units when the tenants fail to pay the monthly amount. In California public storage facilities are allowed to give notice to the tenants of unpaid rent by a certain date and if not, the items are then placed up for auction with notice to the tenants and the public usually through written notice to the tenant and publication of the auction in a newspaper.

The auction is then held and the sale of the items in the stored locker are used to pay the costs of the auction and the unpaid rent. The items get disposed of and the public storage facility gets some payment.

You need to see if your state has a procedure to do these types of auctions like California.

Good luck.


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