How do I show proof of insurance for an ex-boyfriend’s car that I was driving 18 months ago when stopped for a DUI?

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How do I show proof of insurance for an ex-boyfriend’s car that I was driving 18 months ago when stopped for a DUI?

I received a DUI while driving my boyfriend’s car 04/09. The car was insured, but I couldn’t find the proof of insurance in the car. I did show the officer my insurance card. Since then my boyfriend and I broke up and have completely lost touch and the DUI charge has been disposed. Today, more than 18 months later I received notice that I must now show proof of insurance on the car or have my license suspended for 90 days and pay a fine. How can I get proof of insurance when I have no longer have any way to contact the car owner? The VIN and tag number are not on the notice.

Asked on October 26, 2010 under Insurance Law, Indiana

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

No, but they would be part of the court file.  You are going to have to go and get the tag number and then have it run.  Once they run the tag the insurance company code should come up.  Every insurance company is issued a code and that code identifies them on police reports, etc.  One the code comes up you can try and contact the insurance company for the information but you may hit a wall here under privacy issues.  Are you sure that there is no way to track down the ex?  His parents?  A relative or friend?  Someone that can at least put you in contact with him to ge the information for you?  Otherwise, you may have to subpoena the information but you may have to get help with that from the courts and a lawyer.  Good luck.


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