How do I reschedule or get a continuance before my court date since I can’t attend at the last minute?

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How do I reschedule or get a continuance before my court date since I can’t attend at the last minute?

I cannot make it to my court date in a week in a half due to personal reasons that conflict. It’s my second court date and I was released on my own recognizance. I had to sign an agreement to appear at the next date. The clerk’s office did not allow me to change the date ahead. They told methat I should call the court house on the court date to notify them I couldn’t make it for whatever reason I have. My reason isn’t legitimate; I know the judge wouldn’t approve. Is there a way to extend or get a continuance before the actual court date? I want to take care of it before then. Would I just need a good excuse for my absence?

Asked on June 4, 2012 under Criminal Law, California

Answers:

Kevin Bessant / Law Office of Kevin Bessant & Associates

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Your best option is to contact the court the day off and at least let them know the reason why you will not be able to attend court and see if a new court date will issue. If you have an attorney or an attorney appointed to your case, they can ask for an adjournment of the hearing, but even then they need good cause for the judge to adjourn the case. The worst case scenario here is that you miss the court date, the judge issues a bench warrant for your arrest, which means that your personal bond will be revoked, and if brought back before the court to address the matter there is no guarantee that you will be granted another personal bond.


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