How do I protect myself from the company that I work for from taking advantage of me?

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How do I protect myself from the company that I work for from taking advantage of me?

I have worked for a corporate retail company for several years as the head of my department, undertaking management tasks. The company recently hired (then fired) a manager they put above me. Once I saw their job responsibilities I applied for the position, meeting all published job requirements. They just said “no, we need someone more experienced” and yet still have me doing the tasks at an extremely lower rate. Is there anything that I can do legally to stop this company from taking advantage of me?

Asked on April 10, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

Brenda Feigen / Feigen Law Group

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You may have a case of gender or age or other kind of discrimination.  If the person who was hired then fired was younger or whiter or male if you're female or straight if you're gay, it's relevant.  if you don't have a contract with the company that spells out how and when you should be promoted, you should. I do this kind of work so am happy to talk with you.  It does sound as though you should have a lawyer help you.  Best, Brenda Feigen (310-271-0606)

Brenda Feigen

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You may have a case of gender or age or other kind of discrimination.  If the person who was hired then fired was younger or whiter or male if you're female or straight if you're gay, it's relevant.  if you don't have a contract with the company that spells out how and when you should be promoted, you should. I do this kind of work so am happy to talk with you.  It does sound as though you should have a lawyer help you.  Best, Brenda Feigen (310-271-0606)


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