How do I handle a situation where my neighbors in a rental community are unruly but my landlord won’t do anything?

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How do I handle a situation where my neighbors in a rental community are unruly but my landlord won’t do anything?

I have terrible neighbors in my community who constantly party and disrupt us. I have complained numerous times to my landlord and nothing has been done. They are disruptive in the shared space in front and behind our homes, their guests damage our property. Their music is so loud that the music is audible through the walls. Security gives warnings but nothing is done. I cannot prove who has damaged the property. There are no security cameras in back. There is no local noise ordinance. Our lease has a provision for handling it but nothing is ever done. How do I handle this?

Asked on January 23, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You need to contact the police; every town or county has noise ordinances. Consistantly call the police and in the interim contact the consumer protection agency that handles landlord tenant matters and file a complaint. In the public area or from your windows inside your home, place a camera and record. At the end of the day, you can present this evidence to the police, the landlord and others (perhaps local news station and politicians in your neighborhood) and then inform the landlord you are entitled to quiet peace and enjoyment of your property and if this is not rectified, you are entitled to move with all of your security deposit and without notice since your landlord breached the lease.


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