How do i get out of Speed not reasonable and prudent?

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How do i get out of Speed not reasonable and prudent?

on a rainy night i hydroplained my car going into a ditch/trees. leaving the scene because i didnt know i had to call the police and planned to do so the following morning i had a friend pick me up. shortly after i returned to put a note on my car saying everyone was okay and things would be taken care of in the morning. The sheriff charged me with speed not reasonable and prudent in addition to leaving the crime scene.

Asked on May 10, 2009 under Accident Law, New York

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

Yup.  Sheriff had every right to do so.  You were speeding -- clear case-- why? Because on such road conditions, you should have been going really really slowy, or pulling over somewhere safe.  By sheer virtue of you hydroplaning and hitting trees/into the ditch, you were recklessly driving or at the very least speeding.  And yes, you should have at that point called the police -- it would have gone a lot better for you -- instead of running from the scene.

 

Soooooooooooooooooooooooooo, you need a good lawyer (especially if you don't have any priors) to help you negotiate out of this. Why? Because if the prosecutor decides to go further and charge for grossly reckless/negligent driving, you could lose your license.  Find a lawyer at www.attorneypages.com or the NY State Bar.


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