How do I get my manager fired if he’s a womanizer?

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How do I get my manager fired if he’s a womanizer?

My manager definitely drinks on the job; at least a bottle of liquor a day that I know of. He is a womanizer. I have no desire to sleep with him, which I believe has hurt his ego. This wasn’t my original theory, but the men at the job brought it to my attention. He is having an affair with a very young (but of legal age) girl, which is fine except that she doesn’t have to work. She is supposed to be with me in the back prepping cars but I work all alone (and gets paid less). I have brought it to his attention before and then he called a meeting and said to handle it ourselves. He also cut my hours for getting a night job that doesn’t interfere with this one. What are my rights?

Asked on January 8, 2011 under Business Law, South Carolina

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Sexual harassment and discrimination are illegal on the workplace. If you are expected to provide sexual favors to a boss, or are treated worse because you do not, that is against the law. (Note: the drinking on the job is bad for many reasons--poor performance, increase liability, etc.--but is not against the law; from your point of view, that's irrelevant.) If, as you seem to, you think that there is sexual harassment going on at work, which has resulted in you being paid less or otherwise being discriminated against, you can file a complaint with the state or federal department of labor; or you can consult with an employment attorney about whether you have a lawsuit and what it might be worth, and, if worth it, could then sue the company. Good luck.


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