How doI get a judgement removed from my credit report ifI can’t locate the person who filed it?

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How doI get a judgement removed from my credit report ifI can’t locate the person who filed it?

I was living with a former boyfriend 4 years ago. I was paying my half of the rent on time but he wasn’t and the land lord failed to tell me. He filed a disposessory notice which i answered to because I didn’t want to be evicted. I moved out and the ex stayed and a new lease was written. I applied for a mortgage and a judgement for $1500 popped up and the land lord is no where to be found. The rental co no longer exists. He wrote something in writing in the past to a former landlord stating this matter was resolved but I can’t get that paper from the company and I can’t find the former landlord.

Asked on December 14, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, Georgia

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

One way to try and get the judgment against you removed from your credit report is to go down to the court house where it is filed and get all information that you can as to the judgment creditor from the court file and try to make contact with him based upon his last known address in the court file.

If you are unsuccessful in this manner, go to the county recorder's office and pull up his name on the computer. You should be able to get an address for him as to the property that he has in the county where you were renting from him. By getting such an address, you can then write him seeking to pay off the judgment in exchange for a full satisfaction of judgment that he would sign and you file in the court house where the judgment is against you. You can then send a copy of the full satisfaction to the credit reporting company to get the judgment off of your credit report.


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