How doI find if my daughter has savings bonds in her name?

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How doI find if my daughter has savings bonds in her name?

My daughter will be going to college next year. When she was little her grandmother on her father’s side sent me a notice that a savings bond had been purchased in my daughter’s name. We never got the bond. I believe it was mailed to her father who we have no contact with or address to find. Is there a way we can check if there are bonds in her name? Her grandmother used to buy these annually for her grandkids. She is still living but where I don’t know. We have had no contact in 12 years. I’m assuming she stopped purchasing then.

Asked on August 22, 2011 Maine

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you believe that your daughter has some United States savings bonds in her name but cannot locate them or have no idea if they where the bond or bonds might be located, you need to do the following:

1. go online and type in "treasurydirect.gov".

2. you then complete "public debt form 1048" including as much information about the person who was to get the bond, social security number, address, the presenter's name, his or her address, and social security number.

3. take the compeleted 1048 form to a financial institution that sells United States savings bonds. A representative for the financial institution will then send the completed form to the United States Treasury which will do a search based upon the information presented in the form and return the information to either you or the financial institution where form 1048 was presented.

Good luck.


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