How do I figure out what my non-exempt disposable earnings are?

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How do I figure out what my non-exempt disposable earnings are?

My ex-wife filed a foreign judgement against me in the amount of $50,000 regarding our divorce settlement of 3 years ago. I had been paying $900 per month for the first 36 months, then a $50,000 note was due on the 37th month. I filed bankruptcy 2 years ago and don’t have $50,000. So I sent her a check for $500 and stated in the memo area of the check that this was 1 of 100 payments. She has not cashed that check yet. What do I do?

Asked on October 28, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, Washington

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

What you need to do is retain a family law attorney to assist you with respect to the issues that you still have with your former wife and monies that you owe her as the result of the marital dissolution proceeding and final judgment that you have written about.

Your disposable earning are the monthly amount that you receive from all sources of income. Typically the net disposable earning are all costs that you have on a monthly basis subtracted from your monthly disposable earnings.The non-exempt disposable earnings would be your salary, accrued interest on bank accounts, stock dividends and the like excluding social security payments and other sources of income that your state of residence does not include in disposable earnings.

Good luck.


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