How do I execute a foreign judgment?

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How do I execute a foreign judgment?

I had sued someone for over $2,000 in civil court. I received the judgment in my favor. The judge put him on a payment plan per month. He stopped paying after the first month. I had a writ of execution on his bank account but it didn’t have anything in it. I’ve since lost contact with him but recently discovered he moved to PA. I have the address and organization for where he works and I want to do a writ of execution on his wages. How do I go about executing a foreign judgment in PA from IA? And is it possible without knowing his residential to execute a judgment with only knowing the address of the employer?

Asked on August 24, 2010 under Bankruptcy Law, Iowa

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Generally all states have a method by which you can execute a judgement against a party that is from another state.  How it is done is different in every state.  But what you need to do is apply for s "sister state" judgement in the court in which the judgement creditor's property or person is located.  You need to check on the type of paperwork that you will need but an official (and most likely stamped or sealed) copy of the original judgement will be one of those documents.  Notice is given the judgement debtor (as is required in just about every proceeding) and once the judgement is obtained it can be filed and executed upon just like in the state in which it was obtained, but complying with the new state laws of course.  Good luck.


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