How do I enforce court ordered payments that were agreed upon in my divorce?

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How do I enforce court ordered payments that were agreed upon in my divorce?

After 20 years of being a housewife, my husband filled for divorce. I had just

started working a part-time job, he on the other hand made over $90,000.00 a year. The divorce was messy, so I agreed to a settlement of half of of his

retirement, which he said he would not cash in but would make monthly payments instead. I was forced to leave my home of 20 years, I did not feel that my attorney was working in my best interested. Now the divorce is final, and he refuses to pay the $1000 a month. He pays every now then, which has caused me to spend all my savings. He says he doesn’t have to pay me. I still only work a part-time job, being barely able to make ends meet. I only have a high school education, and did not work for 20 years because of being a housewife. I was told I could not get spousal support because I did have a p/t time job during the divorce, and that the state doesn’t require him to pay alimony. What can I do to enforce the Divorce agreement, and can I file for Spousal Support, even after the divorce has been finalized?

Asked on July 17, 2018 under Family Law, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You can enforce a divorce settlement or agreement by suing him for "breach of contract": the agreement is a contract, and he is obligated to follow its terms; if he does not, you sue him like you would anyone violating a contract. The court can order him to pay the agreed-upon amounts.
You cannot file for support after the divorce is finalized and you entered into a divorce settlement or agreement--the agreement was a final and binding resolution of all the economic, etc. issues arising from your marriage and its dissolution.


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