How do I break my lease when I feel the house is unsafe?

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How do I break my lease when I feel the house is unsafe?

The house I live in does not have working smoke or carbon detectors, there are problems with the electrical the main breaker (pops twice a day with barely anything running), the sky lights leak and I believe there might be mold in the house. When confronting my landlord by phone and face-to-face he tells me he doesn’t know what to tell me and does not fix anything. After1 1/2 years I have had enough and have decided to leave. My landlord is giving me a hard time about breaking my lease; he states I have no reason to leave.

Asked on December 12, 2011 under Real Estate Law, New York

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Before you break you lease with your landlord, I suggest that you send him a written letter setting forth the problems that you have had with it in detail keeping a copy of it for future use.

Additionally, you should contact your local health department and building/permit department for an inspection of the rental. If these two entities inspect the unit and violations are mentioned in a report by them, you will have a better reason to end your lease without having to worry about any action by the landlord for unpaid rent for months left on your lease.

I also suggest that you consult with a landlord tenant attorney before you decide to end your lease as well.


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