How can I get information to investigate an item on a credit report?

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How can I get information to investigate an item on a credit report?

We were just turned down for a loan because my wife’s credit report has numerous reports of medical bills sent to collections over an 11 month period starting 3 years ago. They were from a time when she did indeed have a serious medical issue and there was a billing problem at roughly that time, but we gave the hospital the corrected information and they said they were all set. We do not remember receiving any bills and the reported items just list a collections company and the term “medical”. How in the world do we find out what this is all about?

Asked on August 16, 2011 California

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Okay so not you have to take affirmative action to deal with the credit report.  Here is what you need to do.  First, get a copy of your credit reports from all three credit reporting agencies.  Next, take a look at the reports and see what they say about what.  If the reporting is inaccurate you have a right to challenge it and you do so by writingto each of the three credit reporting agencies.  They then have 30 days to turn around and contact the party that placed the ding on your report.  If the creditor does not respond within 30 days the item is supposed to be taken off your report.  You should also contact the creditors and ask for validation of the debts shown.  Once they provide that, and if it shows any inaccuracies, let them know to correct them. Good luck.


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