How can i get a divorce with no money

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How can i get a divorce with no money

I have not seen my husband orspoke
to him in 5 years I am with
someone who wants to marry me but
can’t because I can’t file for a
divorce and I don’t know where he
is

Asked on March 22, 2017 under Family Law, Washington

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

In a situation where a spouse is missing and the other spouse wants a divorce, there is a legal remedy called "divorce by publication". This allows a spouse who cannot be located to be served notice of the divorce action. The fact is that legal action cannot be taken against a person without giving them an opportunity to appear and explain their side. So instead of personally serving the non-filing spouse which is what is usually done, notice of the action can be published in a newspaper in the area of where the missing spouse was last known to live. If they fail to respond within the time specified in the notice, then a divorce by default can be granted. However, each state has it own procedues for this and because this type of divorce can get complicated, you should consider getting legal representation. Since money is an issue, check to see if you are eligible for representation by Legal Aid. If not, see if they can recommend someone to help. Also, you can call to see if there is a law school nearby to where you live as they typically run free or low cost legal clinics which handle divorce cases. Finally, you can contact the county or state bar association in your area since they may have a list of lawyers who will take your case "pro bono" (for free) or at least for a reduced fee based on your income/circumstances. In the meantime, here is a link to a site that may be of help to you: http://www.washingtonlawhelp.org/divorce


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

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