What to do if we recently moved out of a condo and our landlord gave us our security deposit but 2weeks later asked for it back?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What to do if we recently moved out of a condo and our landlord gave us our security deposit but 2weeks later asked for it back?

We recently moved out of a condo and our landlord gave us our security deposit, and in fact said that the place looked clean. Then 2 weeks later, his wife sent us a letter saying that the place was dirty and that we had left a lot of dust on the walls and grease on the stove, and also that both toilets needed to be replaced. Do they have any recourse on this? Also, the condo’s fixture’s are about 30 years old, and we did not damage anything; the only things that broken were a faucet leak, a bathroom fan stopped working, and 2 lights didn’t work anymore (burnt out bulbs).

Asked on August 23, 2011 Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you damaged the premises, the landlord's can seek to get the cost of repair or replacement from you; if they have already returned the security deposit, they would have to sue you (and win) to get compensation.

You are not liable for wear and tear--so, for example, fixtures that need to be replaced solely due to their age--or for routine cleaning (e.g. dusting, the normal grease that accumulates on a stove from use, etc.) You are are potentially liable for anything you, or your guests, pets, or family, broke, as well as for "extraordinary" cleaning caused by your actions (or inactions--e.g. failure to housekeep), such as if you caused an abnormally severe grease build-up or stained a rug or wallpaper in some way that it can't readily be cleaned but must be replaced.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption