What to do about debt collection harassment?

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What to do about debt collection harassment?

I have collector calling my cell about 5 times in a 10 minute period. They seemed to have found where I work and call there 3 times a day. The caller sounds like they are from India at a call center. Says the 4 numbers of the SSN on my voicemail and said it’s under investigation. When I call them back I get dead air. They are getting me in trouble at work. Is there a way to sue these people? Do I have any rights here? I am sure they found my place of work on facebook. I asked them to send me a bill in the mail and they won’t. I would rather pay that way then just give money out over the phone.

Asked on August 9, 2011 Wisconsin

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Under the federal law, "Fair Debt Collection Practices Act" as well as many state laws, improper, harassing, threatening debt collection practices are illegal in this country. Calls to the debtor at work could be deemed improper under these statutes. Multiple telephone calls at odd times can also be a violation of these laws.

You need to first make sure that the calls you are getting are not from some "scam" group that pulled something from your credit report about an obligation owed and are claiming they are entitled to collect for the creditor.

You should consult with a debt collection attorney about this situation and how to resolve the annoying calls and perceived harassment. You do not want to pay off the claimed obligation to some entity that is not even authorized to be making attempts to collect upon it.

If you suspect something suspicious about these telephone calls from this debt collection agency, contact you county's district attorney's office (white collar crime unit) and lodge a complaint.

Good luck.


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