Handicap parking at apartment complex – told how to park… is that legal?

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Handicap parking at apartment complex – told how to park… is that legal?

While attempting to visit a family member at an apartment complex where I do not reside, I tried to parking in handicap parking and use my place card. The property manager literally picked a fight with me regarding how I could and could not park in the marked spot. She stated that I could not back into the spot, even though that was the only way for me to really get out of my car due to limited mobility issues. Plus there was an extra large moving truck which was blocking 2, regular parking spots that was backed in and it blocked the other side of the car not allowing me to fully open my car door and use my cane. What are the rules? is that even legal? Telling handicap people how to park in the marked spot?

Asked on September 18, 2017 under General Practice, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

No, they cannot tell a handicapped person how to park--there simply is no legal basis or authority for doing this. If the property manager tries to restrict you from parking in the spot or put restictions on how you park, you can call the police. 
If the moving truck intruded into your spot, that was illegal and you could have called the police. But if they were not intruding into the handicapped spot but were on the other side of the lines delineating the spot, there is nothing you can do--the handicapped spot itself is protected, but not the space around it.


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