H1b potential future sponsorship

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H1b potential future sponsorship

Hi,

I have a question regarding visa sponsorship. I recently got an offer for an internship this summer I’m on a G4 visa and since I’m still a full-time student won’t need sponsorship until after I graduate. So I think for the internship this won’t be an issue. However, I’m still worried that they might rescind my internship offer since at some point in the future I might need sponsorship from what I’ve heard, internships usually result in full-time after graduation. I also have an offer from another firm so I was wondering what to do? Maybe the other firm, which is also a big four accounting firm, might be willing to sponsor me in the future. Should I email the recruiter and explain my situation? Even though I technically just signed up for the internship and won’t need sponsorship for that. I suppose my work status is something that will come up once they start conducting the background check but I don’t know when that will be.

Asked on October 26, 2016 under Immigration Law, Virginia

Answers:

SB Member California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

You need to come forth with the specifics about your status and have it out on the table.  On the other hand, an internship is just that and is not a guarantee of a job offer.  however, you want to have the conversation whereby you explain that you hope you get the job offer and if and when you do, you would need sponsorship.  For most employers, this is not a big deal as this type of sponsorship happens all the time for 65000 new positions each year, let alone all the ones that are not subject to the annual quota.


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