How long after an alleged crime can charges still be brought?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

How long after an alleged crime can charges still be brought?

My prior employer accused me of Grand Larceny. An officer came to my house the next day. I told him that I was seeking a lawyer. He didn’t arrest me just simply left. 3 weeks later a detective called me, she wanted me to go talk to her I told her that I had nothing to say. I was not arrested. Now its been 2 months since it all started. There are no charges filed against me so far and no arrest warrant. Does this mean that nothing will happen or do Istill need to be worried? Should I speak with a criminal law attorney? In Cheyenne, WY.

Asked on June 22, 2011 under Criminal Law, Wyoming

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Yes you should. should. The fact is that an individual can be prosecuted for a crime as long as they are charged within the applicable "statute of limitations" (SOL). This is the legal limit in which charges can be filed (typically 2-3 years depending on the offense). Since this incident happened fairly recently, the prosecutor's office will need time to investigate. This is why the officers want to speak with you. Yet even without your statement charges can still be filed. At this point you really should consult with a criminal law attorney just in case. And , as you already seem well aware, do not speak to the police without legal counsel.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption