How canI legally qualify for in-state tuition?

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How canI legally qualify for in-state tuition?

I am attending a state college this coming fall, however I must pay the out-of-sate tuition. I do, however, have an aunt that lives 40 minutes from the college. Is it illegal for me to switch my residence to her house to gain in-state tuition for next year? I will be registering to vote in the state and also be getting a drivers license and paying there. I’ll be living on campus though but I will be going to my aunt’s on some weekends and on long holidays.

Asked on August 3, 2011 Iowa

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Most states have residency requirements to be a citizen of that particular state requiring the filing of paperwork by an intended resident and actual residence within a particular state usually for at least six months of continuous residency. 

The application must state that the person who desires to be deemed a resident of the new state actually intends to be so and the application is not being submitted for any improper or fraudulent purposes.

If you actually intend to be a resident of the state where you will be going to school, will be obtaining a driver's license with that new state, registering to vote as a reident in that new state and will be using your aunt's home as your primary residence while you are away at school, then you appear to have the proper intent to be a resident of this other state.

Telling will be where you live during next summer.

If you pass the time period to be deemed a resident of your new state, then you can submit the required application with back up documents to your college to hopefully receive a lower tuition rate and see if it is granted or not.

Good luck.

 

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Most states have residency requirements to be a citizen of that particular state requiring the filing of paperwork by an intended resident and actual residence within a particular state usually for at least six months of continuous residency. 

The application must state that the person who desires to be deemed a resident of the new state actually intends to be so and the application is not being submitted for any improper or fraudulent purposes.

If you actually intend to be a resident of the state where you will be going to school, will be obtaining a driver's license with that new state, registering to vote as a reident in that new state and will be using your aunt's home as your primary residence while you are away at school, then you appear to have the proper intent to be a resident of this other state.

Telling will be where you live during next summer.

If you pass the time period to be deemed a resident of your new state, then you can submit the required application with back up documents to your college to hopefully receive a lower tuition rate and see if it is granted or not.

Good luck.

 


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