What are my rights to find out why I was fired?

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What are my rights to find out why I was fired?

I was hired as a full-time employee as a teacher’s assistant. My hours rarely reached 30 each week. I have been told that legally she should be paying me for 35 hours each week but not sure how the law works. I recently got married,, same sex marriage and was fired the day I returned to work. I know employers have the right to fire for no reason. However, I still asked 3-4 times for a letter that I no longer worked there, so that I can get health insurance, but the owner refuses to give one to me. Is there anything that I can do or do I have any right?

Asked on November 2, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, Massachusetts

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

Unfortunately, employers have no legal obligation to furnish an explanation of, or supporting documentation for, why they terminated an employee: they can fire you without telling you why, and don't have to provide a letter putting the termination in writing. The only exception would be if you sued them, such as for unlawful sexual orientation-based discrimiation (your state makes it illegal to discriminate against an employee due to his/her sexual orientation--based on what you write, you may wish to contact the Massachusetts Commission Agains Discrimination,or MCAD, to discuss this matter, since it is possible you are entitled to compensation), in which event, you could use the legal processes of "discovery" (written questions or interrogatories; requests for documents) to get the information and documentation you seek.


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