Foreign Disclosure Advisor (private contractor) – provides guidance on policy in relation to transferring information from our government to another

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Foreign Disclosure Advisor (private contractor) – provides guidance on policy in relation to transferring information from our government to another

I was working as an analyst then received a promotion to being an advisor. However, I am still getting paid as an analyst (so I am doing the job but not getting the money). My company says it is the military’s fault. My feeling is, my agreement to work is with the company, not military. If the company is having difficulties getting compensation for work done why am I affected? I should get paid for what I do. Is this correct thinking?

Asked on June 12, 2009 under Employment Labor Law, Alaska

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

Generally speaking, private companies are under no obligation to give people raises when they are promoted or otherwise take on new responsibilities. (The exceptions would be if there is a some contract, collective bargaining agreement, or other writing setting forth the pay for different positions.) That doesn't seem fair--and it isn't--but it is legal. It's also more common than you'd think, especially in tough economic times--a title is much cheaper to give out than a raise.

If you are being paid differently than other analysts and you think or can prove it's because of discrimination against you on race, religious, gender, disability, etc. status, you may have a claim; otherwise, it's probably perfectly legitimate, though again, unfair, for your company to promote you without giving you more money.

 


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