Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

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UPDATED: Feb 18, 2020

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According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, there were 2,183 truck fatalities in Florida in 2006. In Florida as in other states, truck accidents are more complex than car crashes. While automobile accidents typically involve two vehicles and a limited number of parties, truck accidents bring in multiple factors, making any subsequent personal injury litigation more complicated. The truck’s owner, its driver, manufacturer, insurance carrier, brake manufacturer, and other parties all come into play when a truck gets into an accident.

Who Is At Fault?

In Florida, accidents involving trucks are covered under both state and federal law, in addition to commercial trucking regulations. These factors can complicate investigations into who is at fault.

Florida Insurance Regulations

Florida state law, as well as agencies such as the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), regulate the activities of truck drivers for both in-state and interstate traffic. Insurance regulations also apply: federal regulations stipulate that truck drivers who are conducting interstate commerce that crosses state lines must be insured for at least $750,000 to cover property damage and injury, with higher amounts required for trucks carrying hazardous materials. Florida also requires that truckers carry at least $750,000 insurance and stipulates up to $5,000,000 in insurance for hazardous material cargos.

If You Are Involved in a Trucking Accident

The first step in resolving a Florida truck accident is contacting an experienced attorney. A Florida truck accident lawyer who is well-versed in insurance and regulatory issues can help navigate confusing rules, such as state statutes of limitation, interstate issues, and the ins and outs of trucking insurance. The attorney will know how to best conduct an investigation into a truck accident and can help uncover factors such as alcohol or drug use, traffic conditions, and driver fatigue.

An attorney with experience handling truck accident cases will know how to negotiate between the many parties involved, including insurance companies, cargo owners, the other driver, manufacturers, and the other parties. Your Florida truck accident lawyer can help you decide on a legal strategy as you pursue compensation for your damages.

To have your case evaluated by an experienced Florida truck accident lawyer, fill out our case evaluation form. There is no cost and no obligation.