My ex-wife has had custody of our children since the divorce. It’s been four years and I’d like to have physical custody for awhile. Under what circumstances can I obtain a child custody modification?

Courts generally oppose granting a child custody modification that would essentially bounce the children from one parent to another and back. Most judges seek an arrangement that will provide long-term stability for the child because this is deemed to be in the’best interest of the child,’ the overriding standard in all child custody decisions.

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Can child custody rights be modified?

The ability to modify child custody rights will depend on whether the two parents agree that a change needs to be made to a custody agreement or, absent agreement, whether the court believes that there has been a material change of circumstances and that the best interest of the child dictates that a custody change needs to be made.

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How to Modify Child Custody Orders

When making a decision about child custody, family law courts favor stable living arrangements rather than disruptive change. After a custody decision has been made, a court may modify child custody only if there has been a material change of circumstances that suggest it is in the best interest of the child to change custody from one parent to the other.

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What qualifies as a

If a custody arrangement is in place and one of the parents wishes to modify it, he or she will need to prove that there has been a material change in circumstances. A material change in circumstances is something that alters the conditions of the child’s life significantly enough that it may change the court’s decision on what was in the best interests of the child.

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How to Change Child Custody When the Other Parent Won’t Agree

When a child custody agreement is in place, that agreement is legally binding and both parents must share the child according to the terms of that agreement. If you decide you want to change child custody, you can’t make a unilateral decision to do so. This means if both parents do not agree on a modification, you’ll have to go to court and convince the court to change child custody.

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Can cohabitation affect spousal support or child custody?

The definition of cohabitation varies from state to state, but the term generally refers to an unmarried couple living together in a romantic relationship. According to the U.S. Census, the number of unmarried couples living together increased tenfold from 1960 to 2000. Cohabitation can be an attractive option for couples, but if you are divorced or separated from your ex-spouse, you should understand the ramifications of cohabitation before moving in with your new partner.

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What is a child visitation plan?

A child visitation plan, sometimes part of a parenting plan, is an important part of co-parenting. Read on for more information about child visitation plans and how they fit in with a good parenting plan.

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