Extradition from missouri to california

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Extradition from missouri to california

son has broken probation by traveling to mo. was on probation in calif. felony intent to sell weed case. would they go as far as missouri to bring him back?

Asked on June 5, 2009 under Criminal Law, Missouri

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

Once your son broke probation, his probation officer would have violated him.  This would have resulted in a bench warrant having been issued for his arrest.  Depending on the amount of marijuana that he was attempting to sell, California police may feel that this offense does not merit tying up much manpower and money. Therefore, they may not actively pursue him to Missouri.  However warrants do not expire.  If he is stopped for something as simple as a traffic ticket, this could all come up.  It would be better for him to go back voluntarily.

And remember, this assumes that California is not looking for him, for all you know they are in pursuit of your son at this very moment.  What he needs to do now is to consult with a criminal attorney in the area where the warrant was issued; someone that is local to the court in question will have a better idea on the best way to handle things.

Best of luck.

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

I suspect that they will go to Missouri, or even Maine, if necessary, if he's a fugitive from justice.  Sooner or later, he will be caught, and it will probably be best for him, in the long run, if he goes back and turns himself in now.  Before he does that, he should hire, or at least talk to, a good California criminal defense lawyer.  He can find counsel in a number of places, including our website, http://attorneypages.com

If California wants to have your son arrested, it won't matter how far he runs.  And no respectable attorney will tell you that running makes any sense, ultimately, both on principle and for practical reasons.


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