Eviction timeline when we offered to pay and she threatened us that if we didn’t have the money by end of business day that she was going to court.

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Eviction timeline when we offered to pay and she threatened us that if we didn’t have the money by end of business day that she was going to court.

We owe back rent in the amnt of $3,000. We got a letter that said we were getting evicted in three days but to call her to discuss payments. We were negotiating with her and then she said that she wanted the money by end of business day or we were out.

Asked on June 1, 2009 under Real Estate Law, Minnesota

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

That's a lot of back rent.  If your landlord completed the process the right way, she really was not under any law that said she had to wait for her money any longer.  I'm not a Minnesota lawyer, and the law in this area does differ a bit from one state to the next.  And I don't have all the facts of your case. For reliable advice, you need to have a lawyer who knows the situation.  One place to look for an attorney is our website, http://attorneypages.com

There may be some technicality that the landlord missed, but maybe not, in which case you are about to be evicted.

J.M.A., Member in Good Standing of the Connecticut Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I am a lawyer in CT but i practice in this area.  You are not required to leave unless the landlord goes through the proper legal process to evict you.  this means that she needs to file an eviction notice (which she has) and needs to then file a complaint in court and litigate the action untill the court enters a judgment that you must leave.  this usually takes 4-8 weeks.  I suggest that you talk to the landlord about negotiating a new lease or make arrangements to leave.


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