Eviction of persons not on a lease

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Eviction of persons not on a lease

My rentor stated on her rental form that only she and her 2 children would be occupying the rental property. Since she has moved in no one has see any children, and there is a constant stream of cars coming to the house and several men living in the house even when the tenant is not home. There are also cars on the property that do not belong to the rentor. How do I get rid of the men who do not belong in the house and the cars that do not belong to the paying tenant. She was also told there could be no pets, and she has two pincher/pit bulls mixed on the property. Can I call animal control?

Asked on May 21, 2009 under Real Estate Law, North Carolina

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

You can't call animal control, but you can call a lawyer, because these facts probably give you more than one solid reason to evict her, and that's probably the only way you can solve these problems.  One place to find an attorney to help you with this is our website, http://attorneypages.com

A lease is a contract.  And even if there is no written lease, you may be able to do something based on her rental form.  However, every state has very specific steps that have to be followed to evict a tenant, and if you make a mistake you have to go back and start over.

If people are coming and going from the property all the time, staying a few minutes only, someone in the house might be selling drugs there.  If you can say, from your own knowledge, that this kind of in-and-out traffic is going on, you should report this to the police immediately.


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