Who is responsible for fixing a tenant’s mailbox – the landlord or the post office?

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Who is responsible for fixing a tenant’s mailbox – the landlord or the post office?

Everyone’s mailbox in my apt complex is broken. Landlord says its post office responsibility. Post office says landlord’s. Who’s right? What next? The boxes have been broken since Katrina.

Asked on September 29, 2010 under Real Estate Law, Louisiana

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

It is my understanding that mailboxes for an apartment complex that are keyed by the United States Postal Service are also to be maintained by the Untied States Postal Service.  This comes from an understanding that the keys for a mailbox can not be copied and given out if they are maintained by the USPS. But it does seem like a huge undertaking for the USPS and it would not be a surprise to me that they in some way "delegate" the duty to the landlord under some local law.  I would go back to the Post Office and speak with a supervisor and then his or her supervisor until someone could point me in the direction of where this is written down.  Then I would file a complaint with whatever Department of Housing in your area that regulates the building.  This is a service that needs to be up and running just like electricity, etc. See if they can help.  It may be a violation of the building code and no landlord wants a fine.  Good luck. 


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