How to Write a Living Will

A living will is a legally binding document instructing your family and physicians regarding your medical wishes in case of incapacitation. A living will must clearly communicate your wishes.

→ Read More

Living Wills Overview

A living will is a document that sets out your wishes about the medical treatment you do, or do not, want to receive should you be unable to communicate with your health care providers or your family.

→ Read More

What Is a Living Will?

A living will is the name given to a document in which you can set out the nature and extent of the treatment you would like to receive if circumstances ever arise in which you can’t communicate, perhaps because of a stoke, or coma. In your living will you can express a desire for extensive and heroic treatment to keep you alive, no matter what, regardless of the circumstances.

→ Read More

Is a living will different from a living trust?

A living trust is very different from a living will. A living trust is a way to manage and control property during your lifetime and to distribute it at your death. A living will allows you to control your health care if you become incapacitated.

→ Read More

What happens if there is no living will or durable power of attorney?

A living will is a document where you give instructions about your health care if you should become incapacitated and unable to give direction yourself. A durable power of attorney (also called a “power of attorney for health care”) names a person you trust to make these decisions for you. Living wills and durable powers of attorney come into effect only if you are unable to make health care decisions for yourself.

→ Read More

Which is better: a living will or a durable power of attorney for health care?

A living will is a document with instructions you make directly to your doctor about what kind of care you want if you should become unable to make decisions about your healthcare. A durable power of attorney for Heath care (DPA) is a document where you appoint someone you trust, such as a relative or a friend, to make medical decisions for you if you are no longer able to make them for yourself.

→ Read More

Does my family have liability if my advance directive instructs no heroic measures or life support?

In following your living will or Advance Directive for Health Care your health care providers and family will be carrying out your wishes for your health care. As long as you were competent when you executed (signed) your living will or Advance Directive for Heath Care, your health care providers, family, and the representative you named in your Directive are all legally obligated to follow your directions.

→ Read More