Do I have to repay an overpayment of unemployment benefits?

If you were paid unemployment benefits to which you were not entitled, then, you are’liable’ for the overpayment.If accepting the overpayment was innocent on your part’e.g. you did nothing to cause it to happen, and also did not previously realize it was an overpayment’then you should not be liable for anything other than the return of the money.

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Unemployment Benefits After Moving Out of State

If you are receiving unemployment insurance benefit payments when you move out of state, you may still receive unemployment payments from the state that awarded the benefit. A worker’s eligibility, amount and duration of unemployment benefit payments, and disqualifications will be determined by the state where wages were paid and earned.

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Unemployment Benefits After Being Fired

In some cases, an employee can collect unemployment after being fired. However, unemployment benefits are not available in all cases and sometimes being fired renders an employee ineligible for benefits. Individual state eligibility guidelines determine when an employee can receive unemployment and these guidelines may differ slightly from one jurisdiction to the next.

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Unemployment Disqualifications

Unemployment disqualifications, factors disqualifying individuals from receiving unemployment benefits, can occur for a variety of reasons from having been terminated from employment for cause to classification as an independent contractor when you thought you were an employee.

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Collecting Unemployment After Relocating: Trailing Spouse Provision

What is known as a “trailing spouse” provision contained in unemployment laws, this allows a person who has had to quit their job in order to relocate with their spouse to collect unemployment benefits. This is in the interest of keeping the family together. Relocation can be within the state or to another state.

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Effect of Severance Pay on Eligibility for Unemployment Compensation

If an employee is involuntarily separated from work (e.g. fired not for cause; lay off); he or she is eligible for unemployment insurance his or her employment ends. If an employee receives severance and that severance is paid over time, or if that person signs a voluntary leave document that could negatively impact his or her eligibility for unemployment insurance.

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