Employer Fraud

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Employer Fraud

I am a RN at a clinic. I work per diem so my schedule and time varies at the facility. My employer was raided by the FBI. I found out about the raid from friends who knew I worked at the clinic and from news reports. I had to reach out to my manager and probe for simple information. For one, I feel that the facility should have notified me considering I am employed by them. Nevertheless, we were told they are under investigation for Medicaid fraud. I am not sure what to believe. I feel uncomfortable with the entire situation and I do not want my license to be jeopardized. I want to quit but I do not want the decision to backfire on me. I have not been contacted by investigators nor do I hear anything about the investigation. What are my rights or what do I need to know about cases like this?

Asked on May 1, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, New Jersey

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

You have no rights to know about what is going on, apart from what you *may* be able to get via a Freedom of Information Act request to the FBI (which may legitimately not be honored--law enforcement has considerable discretion to not release information which could damage or complicate their investigation). Your employer has no obligation to tell you about lawsuits, criminal investigations, prosecutions, etc. against them, the same way that if you were, for example, the employer could not force you to release information about the legal matter to them.


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