Employer communication

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Employer communication

I have a problem with managing director at the company that swore at me and asked me if I am stupid. He kept swearing at me this was last week. Today he sent me a mail telling me,

Asked on October 19, 2016 under Employment Labor Law, Alaska

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

Workplace harrassment is only actionable if it is based on some form of illegal discrimination. For example, it is based on your race, religion, age (over 40), disability, national origin, etc. Also, it must not violate the terms of any applicable union agreement or employment contract. Otherwise, while unprofessional, your treatment is legal. The fact is that rude and boorish behavior is not grounds for a lawsuit, no matter how distasteful. That's because most employment is "at will" which means that your company can set the conditions of employment much as it sees fit. Unfortunately, your only options here are to put up with all of this or seek work elsewhere.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

You can't do anything about this unless your employer (the director, etc.) is harassing you or discriminating you due to your race, color, national origin, sex, disability, religion, or age over 40--and not just that you are a minority  or over 40, for example, but the cause of or reason for the treatment is your race or age. Otherwise, unless the treatment is aimed at you due to one of these few, specifically protected categories, your employer may be as insulting, profane, rude, unpleasant, mean, bullying, etc. as it likes; the law does not require professional, courteous, or fair treatment. Often, when you have awful bosses, your only real recourse is to look for a different job.


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