Who bears responsibilityif someone has too much to drink at an employee farewell dinner?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Who bears responsibilityif someone has too much to drink at an employee farewell dinner?

Employees will be meeting after work at a restaurant for a farewell dinner. Each employee is responsible for their own tab/drinks. Company money will not be involved. This is not a function of the organization. Who is liable if something should happen?

Asked on July 12, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Florida

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Good question. Assuming the farewell dinner and send off is not a company sponsored event and assuming some person gets injured in an alcohol or non-alcohol related incident at the send off or immediately after its ending, the employer for all the employees would not be responsible for any injuries or damages.

Rather, the person causing the injury and or damages would be ulitimately responsible.

However, in some States in this country, the restaurant's owners hosting the farewell dinner could potentially be responsible for any alcohol related injuries (in addition to the person actually causing the injury) to a third person or even a guest of the restaurant who is an employee of the company who happens to get injured under statute for knowingly serving alcohol to an intoxicated customer. Facts for possible liability and damage responsibility would vary under the circumstances leading to an incident.

Gven the known dangers of drinking and driving, a designated driver or a cab for the attending employees at the send off is a good idea.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption