What to do if electrical code violations were not completed as agreed regarding our house purchase?

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What to do if electrical code violations were not completed as agreed regarding our house purchase?

We recently purchased a home but prior to signing, we had “all electrical up to code” as one of our agreed upon terms. The seller’s realtor had an electrician come in and do some work the day before signing and we were told it is now up to code. Now, 4 months later, we are working on some home renovations in the basement and had an electrician come in to complete some work for installing new ceiling lights. He found multiple code violations in our furnace room (unfinished) and in a bathroom (behind a drop down ceiling, you can just lift a tile and see behind it). He said the total cost to have the basement up to code would be around $400. Who is liable since our terms stated that the electrical was to be up to code? The previous homeowner? The inspector? The seller’s realtor? Us?

Asked on September 22, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Nebraska

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you have closed escrow and found out that the written agreement with the sellers that the electrical components with the home would be to code before close and it was not, the sellers are responsible for the additional costs for you to bring it to electrical code compliance which is $400.00 in your circumstances.

You needto have your real estate agent advise the seller's agent that the home is not code compliant as agreed and the cost to do so is $400.00 inquiring if the sellers want to bring it up to code or shall you. Give a stated time period for a response.

If you do not receive an acceptable response in the given time period, pay for the work yourself and send the sellers the invoice for payment.

If they do no make the payment in the stated time period, small claims is your option.

Good luck.


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