What happens when you get a DUI in one state but are licensed in another?

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What happens when you get a DUI in one state but are licensed in another?

I received a DUI conviction in CA 2 months ago and my suspension is scheduled to be up in another4 months. I have complied with all of my court supervisions (i.e. DUI class, community service, etc). The CA DMV told me they will inform IL about my DUI A my suspension after it has been served. Does this mean that I will lose my license again when IL finds out?

Asked on June 14, 2011 under Criminal Law, Illinois

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

So here is what I think that you are saying.  That you are licensed to drive a car in BOTH California and Illinois? Is that correct?  Technically speaking you are not permitted to be licensed in two states at one time so I think what you face is not suspension of the Illinois license for the DUI conviction but because of the issue of dual licensing.  If I am incorrect in my understanding of your question please write back.  But if you are licensed only in Illinois but convicted and suspended in California, you must also comply with the Illinois laws on the issue.  One major pitfall for persons who get a DUI conviction in one state while being licensed in another is FAILURE to comply with BOTH states' rules for license reinstatement.  If both states' regulations are not met, the driver WILL BE BARRED in the state that non-compliance has occurred.  If caught driving in THAT state --- even with a plastic license from another state --- will lead to arrest for driving while suspended (or driving while revoked).   


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