Does my landlord have to provide a copy of a signed renewal lease agreement if the terms of the original agreement changed?

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Does my landlord have to provide a copy of a signed renewal lease agreement if the terms of the original agreement changed?

I rented a property and my original lease term was up at the end of the month before last. I met my landlord to sign anew, 12 month agreement and all she did was have me sign another piece of paper for the new term, the new term also included an increase of rent by $30 per month. I have yet to receive a copy of this agreement and it has been 3 months. Is she required to provide this to me? She says she isn’t because the terms didn’t change. I am now trying to break this new lease due to the living conditions that she has not mended after a couple requests.

Asked on August 11, 2011 Michigan

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you signed a whole new lease agreement for the unit you were renting, you are entitled to receive a copy of it from the landlord immediately.

You need to write the landlord a letter asking for a copy of the new lease that you signed by a certain date. If the landlord fails to provide a copy of the new lease to you, you should contact your local landlord tenant clinic about the situation and make a complaint. Potentially the clinic will intercede upon your behalf.

If your living conditions are poor and the landlord has yet to make any attempts to correct the problem after requests from you, consider contacting your local health department about the problems and request an inspection.

If an inspection is made and the landlord cited, you will most likely get the repairs made quickly as well as a copy of the new lease you signed.

Good luck.

 

 


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