Does an unlockable patio door give me legal grounds to break my lease?

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Does an unlockable patio door give me legal grounds to break my lease?

Since day one my first floor patio door has been broken and cannot close or lock. I initially reported this problem the day after move-in, June 4th. Since then, I have made multiple, documented requests to have this problem fixed. I was initially told this problem would be fixed 2 months ago. The only thing I can find in my state code about sliding glass doors is that they must have “effective waterproofing and weather proofing including unbroken doors and windows”. Can I break my lease as a security concern because my patio door does not lock?

Asked on August 12, 2012 under Real Estate Law, California

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Under the laws of all states in this country just because the patio door does not lock does not in and of itself give you grounds to terminate your lease with your landlord without recourse. I suggest that you write your landlord a note giving him or her 15 days to remedy the problem since it is a security issue and if not remedied, you will hire a person to fix it and the landlord will be billed for such. Keep a copy of the letter for future use and need.

If the due date comes and goes, your option is to have a third party come and make the repairs and bill the property owner.

 


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