Does a developer need to disclose plans for subdivision?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Does a developer need to disclose plans for subdivision?

I purchased a lot and built a home on a lot in a subdivision that I thought would have other homes like mine in it. After all, he had built a couple of homes to sell that were similar to mine. After my purchase, he sold lots which has turned my neighborhood into a low-income neighborhood. If I would have known he was selling to Little Dixie I would not have built my dream home there

Asked on April 17, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Oklahoma

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Under all state's subdivision laws a tentative map and a final map is required in the application process approved by a given municipality's permit and resource department. The tentative and final map for a subdivision only pertain to the configuration of streets, utilities to be installed and the lots.

The actual homes to be built are through another process after final map approval is made where the developer then goes through a process to get approval of the homes intended to be built.

Unfortunately from what I see in your question, your measure of damages would be determined at the time of your purchase as to whether you overpaid for the lot that you built. If your property decreased in value due to market conditions or the presence of low income housing, under the law it does not appear that such would be a proper measure of damages for you.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption