do warrants in Los Angeles County Central Court ever go away or expire.

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do warrants in Los Angeles County Central Court ever go away or expire.

I have 2 warrants for **** related grand theft and receiving stolen property, 2 counts from 12/20/01, warrants issured 06/19/02These have never been exercised in the states of Oregon and Wshington where I live

Asked on May 3, 2009 under Criminal Law, Oregon

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

The warrant should not expire until served or recalled.  By recall I mean absent action from someone within the criminal justice system deactivating it--for example, a prosecutor obtaining an order from the issuing magistrate recalling the warrant.  This is done to clean up the system on old warrants especially for, relatively speaking, more of the minor legal matters.  However based on your set of facts - grand theft, receipt of stolen property - I seriously doubt that is applicable to your case.

It is possible for a warrant to become stale meaning you may be able to challenge it on speedy trial or statute of limitations grounds for example, but this would occur after you are served with the warrant.
If you ever have any run-ins with law enforcement, regardless of the state, these warrants will turn up.  They could even turn up in something a simple as an employment background check and someone could turn you in.  Oregon or Washington would then extradite you back to California to stand trial for the charges you face.  Don't think just because the L.A. police have not come after you that you are safe.
You need to seek legal counsel.  A good criminal attorney can help you sort this out.  You only make things worse by hiding.  Besides do you want to live looking over your shoulder for the rest of your life?

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