Do probation officers have any laws or guidelines they are supposed to follow?

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Do probation officers have any laws or guidelines they are supposed to follow?

Are probation officers held to any guidelines or laws in ID? Or can they just tell you whatever suits them? Specifically, can they lie to you and tell you that you are off probation and your early release papers will be in the mail? And then 3 months later just call and say, oh well I haven’t done anything for 3 months and now I want you in for U.A. and then maybe I’ll think about putting in those papers that I already told you that I did? Isn’t that a big violation of my civil rights? And a huge moral violation? I thought they where here to help you?Not to betray your trust, lie, and deceive? I thought if I could trust anyone in the legal system that it should be my P.O.? How else am I supposed to be rehabilitated?

Asked on October 11, 2010 under Criminal Law, Idaho

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Probation offiers generally are under the control, so to speak, of the Department of COrrections in your area.  They are an extension of that department but their duty is to report to the Courts on their cases.  If you have a problem with your probation officer the Department of Corrections should have a process for filing a grievance.  I would, however, speak with your attorney before you do this.  A "probation officer gone bad" is not a good thing and putting yourself in a position of being targeted for reporting him may not be the best place to be.  Ask your attorney about applying for a change of officers or getting on his "good side" and helping you apply for early release at this point.  A buffer so to speak. If your attorney makes an application to the court your PO will be testifying.  No, what is happeneing to you is not right.  But you must follow the PO's demands at this point for fear of having probation revoked.  Good luck. 


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