Do I or both of us have to appear in court if I file for an uncontested divorce?

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Do I or both of us have to appear in court if I file for an uncontested divorce?

I heard the easiest and cheapest way to get a divorce is to file uncontested and to print the papers out yourself. Is this true? If I do print the papers out myself and we both sign and fill everything out correctly do I just get to take it to the court house and a judge signs off on them? My husband lives in on state and I live in another neighboring state so it would be hard for him to make it to court. What’s the best fastest and cheapest way to file in my case?

Asked on April 17, 2012 under Family Law, Virginia

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

My experience is that unless there is a contested divorce with a lot of acrimony, most people who wish to end their marriage where there is nothing in dispute simply can resolve matters through an uncontested divorce.

In such a situation the parties prepare and sign their own marital dissolution agreement, file it with the court and the court then approves it with an order as to its terms.

The fastest and cheapest way to go about the above is for you or your soon to be former husband to go down to the county courthouse where the dissolution will be filed, get the needed paperwork from the court clerk and each of you fill it out, date, sign and file it with the court clerk.


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