Do I need a malpractice lawyer?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Do I need a malpractice lawyer?

I had problems with one of my wisdom tooth and was given advice that it’s best to
get the all removed at the same time even though the others weren’t bothering
me. At any rate I went to get them all removed but got only 3 out of 4 removed.
The dentist said that my bones in my teeth were so strong that he was having
trouble removing one of them and decided after removing that to just leave the
last one end. It was a horrible surgery, he had to sedate me twice and right
after removal I started to lose my voice. I have been losing my voice ever since
and every single person at my job noticed it. My voice comes and goes quite
frequently. It took almost 4 weeks for my jaws to go down from being swollen.
In July it will be 2 years since the surgery and I am still losing my voice all
the time for days at a time.

Asked on May 1, 2018 under Malpractice Law, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Based on what you write, you may well have a viable, or worthwhile, claim for malpractice: this appears to have negligent, or careless, medical treatment, and it has evidentally caused you some permanent life impairment (the voice issues). 
Do you need a lawyer? Not legally--you are allowed to represent yourself as your own attorney or "pro se." However, malpractice cases can be very complex cases--it is *highly* unlikely that a layperson (nonlawyer) can successfully handle one. You should have an attorney.
Many malpractive lawyers offer a free initial consultation to evaluate a case--you can confirm this before making the appointment. Meet with such an attorney to discuss your case. Do so NOW: you write that 2 years have passed--but the statute of limitations, or time within which you must file your lawsuit--is only 2 years for malpractice in your state. If you haven't run out of time, you are running out of it: don't delay, but meet with an attorney right away, before more time passes.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption