Do I have to pay rent on a house that the house is full of mold and is pretty much a unlivable?

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Do I have to pay rent on a house that the house is full of mold and is pretty much a unlivable?

My house is full of mold, the windows leak (even after putting up the plastic), there are soft spots in the floor which I could fall through at any moment. All of the faucets leak. The house is always cold even with the heat turned on. My electric bill is over $300 a month and the house isn’t even warm. I told my landlord who doesn’t fix anything usually. I have been paying rent on this place for 5 years and he barely fixes any problems that come up. he is a slum lord and I am fed up with it. I cannot afford to move because of money issues.

Asked on January 16, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Oregon

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You need to bring this issue to your local consumer protection agency. This can be your state attorney general, city or county prosecutor, building and safety department or HUD (housing and urban development). At the end of the day, it will probably take a field rep from the building and safety department to determine if this place has a certificate of occupancy and if it is habitable. It sounds like it is not habitable. You may need to contact the health department regarding the mold. I say this because if this all goes in your favor, your landlord may have to pay you to move and if you are really lucky, some additional monies.


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