Do I have to pay a tuition debt to a university if I was admitted but never attended classes?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Do I have to pay a tuition debt to a university if I was admitted but never attended classes?

Last fall I was slated to attend a university. I attended orientation where we registered for classes. I ran into financial issues and couldn’t attend. I called an admissions representative and told them I would need to defer my admission until the next year. They said that was fine and did not inform me of any further steps that I would need to take. Now, I have received a letter from a debt collector saying that I owed $10,000+ to the school. I called the collector and informed him that I never attended the school nor signed any financial forms. He said it didn’t matter since I didn’t officially drop my classes.

Asked on July 14, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, Illinois

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

To answer your question, you first need to read your contract to attend the university that you wer accepted to attend as well as all other documents that the university sent you including a student handbook.

These documents would control whether you owe the $10,000 or not for failing to get a written deferral from the university to start up courses the following year.

If you failed to comply with the "contract" and school rules that you agreed to by enrolling at the university and owe the $10,000, you should meet with one of the deans and admission/tuition personnel to see if the school might try and work out the money you apparently owe it since you did not sign/file documents deferring your enrollment and tutition payment for the following year.

Good luck.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption