Do I have legal rights for quitting if I feel there was a hostile work environment?

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Do I have legal rights for quitting if I feel there was a hostile work environment?

I quit my job the end of last month due to a conflict with a co-worker/boss’s son. I questioned the co-worker about forging my name to semi-annual income verification reports for DHS ( I hadn’t seen any when asked for copies of payroll sheets. This happened 2 times in the lat 6 months). I told the co-worker I would call his case worker. The co-worker went to his dad, the boss. I got in trouble and told to mind my own business. I stated that his son was forging my name is my business. The boss said to put any papers to be signed for his son on his desk. The co-worker/son started treating me bad so I quit.

Asked on September 21, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Arkansas

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

I think that you have a valid claim on some level here but I also think that it may be best for you to consult with an employment attorney on the matter as soon as you can.  Forging your name on DHS documents is a serious matter and it needs to be addressed.  If you were being targeted after reporting the issue to your superior then I can see how the matter could justify your quitting.  But I would want to know the level of treatment that caused this feeling of a hostile environment.  Was it that the co-worker now felt that they could do as they pleased and get away with it causing you to worry about your performance and liabilities? You may be able to file for unemployment at the very least. Get help here.  Good luck.


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