Do I have good cause to voluntarily quit my current position and collect UI.

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Do I have good cause to voluntarily quit my current position and collect UI.

I have several examples of harassment in the workplace from my immediate supervisor. I also have documentation of changes in my position that have worsened the position that I applied for. For example, one employee was fired in Oct 08, I was asked to temp. overtake his responsibilites. The job listing has been posted since Dec. 08 and my supervisor will not hire a replacement.

Asked on July 6, 2009 under Employment Labor Law, Kentucky

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

Being asked to take over another employee's responsibilities is generally reasonable--it happens all the time, especially in a recession. (It might not be reasonable if you now had to work far away and travel extensively, or were placed in an unsafe position.) The mere fact that you have additional responsiblities would not, of itself, generally constitute good cause to leave a job.

Similarly, employers are under no obligation to fill open positions.

However, when you say "harassment," that may consitute reasonable grounds to quit. Be careful though--if it's just that you and your boss don't get along or he/she doesn't like you, that's not enough--there's no "right" to like or enjoy your job, or get along with your employer.

If, on the other hand, your supervisor is harassing you because of your race, religion, gender, etc., that is *not* permitted, and you may have an employment discrimination case. If that is the situation, contact the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and see what they say about your case.


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